The Amero Currency: Myths, Facts and 25 Great Resources for Further Research

by Miranda Marquit on May 25, 2009

For the last few years, there has been talk about a North American currency. The recent success of the euro, and efforts by six Persian Gulf states to create a unified currency, have created a climate in which there is speculation that Canada, Mexico and the United States would enter a similar arrangement. Trade agreements such as NAFTA certainly play a role in keeping speculation about the Amero alive and well. But what is the Amero? What are the myths surrounding this North American currency? And what are bloggers saying about the Amero? Here are 25 sites that can answer your questions about the Amero.

General Information About the Amero

nafta_logoThe Amero was originally suggested by Canadian Herbert C. Grubel in 1999 on the eve of the European Union. Since then, it has taken on a history of its own, with politicians and pundits alike talking about it and analyzing its possible effects. Here are some Web sites that offer insight, history and information about the Amero.

  1. CurrencyTrading.net offers an excellent overview of the Amero, the history of the idea, and the benefits and drawbacks of a North American currency union. It also includes a section on how an Amero might affect the currency market.
  2. Wikipedia: “North American currency union” provides information regarding the history of the Amero, as well as support for the Amero in some regions. Additionally, it includes concerns about adopting a single currency for North America.
  3. GlobalResearch.ca: “North-American Monetary Integration: Here Comes the Amero” tracks the progress of thought surrounding the Amero and currency arrangements in North America. A great history of which groups are interested in a currency union, as well as steps that some think could precede the adoption of the Amero.
  4. The U.S. Government offers a section on its Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America Web site addressing the efforts being made by North American countries to cooperate. This also includes information about Amero rumors.
  5. Gold-Eagle.com offers an interesting look at the history of U.S. currency, as well as how it might transition into the Amero — before pointing out the reasons that actually making the leap to a unified North American currency is unlikely.

Busting Myths Surrounding the Amero

There are plenty of myths surrounding the Amero, from so-called coins that have been minted and bills circulated, to the idea that the release of the Amero is imminent across North America. These sites offer motivations behind the perpetuation of the Amero myth, as well as debunking the idea that a North American Union is about to descend upon us. You don’t have to attend the most expensive college to understand that the Amero just isn’t happening (anytime soon at least).

  1. Snopes.com debunks the idea that the U.S. (possibly at the Denver Mint) has been producing Amero coins.
  2. The Lang Report offers in-depth information about the exaggeration of current events that is feeding reports of an imminent North American currency union.
  3. The Seattle Times offers an editorial by Bruce Ramsey about the origin of the mythology surrounding the Amero and a super-sovereign North American Union — and why it is largely unlikely.
  4. Mises Economics Blog provides a brief look at where the Amero coin images came from, as well as debunking the reasons that the Amero myth keeps circulating.
  5. Irregular Times follows the ways in which the Amero myth is used as a political tool to drum up fear for American sovereignty and try to and mobilize supporters.
  6. The Boston Globe delves into what is behind the fascination with the Amero myth, and the basics of this conspiracy theory.
  7. Mr. Swing points out that Candian radio host Hal Turner is largely responsible for the most recent frenzy over the Amero, with his assertion that a “rogue Treasury agent” provided him with a “real” Amero coin.

Blogs, Posts and Web Sites About the Amero

There are plenty of blog posts and Web sites about the Amero. Watch out, though: You can’t believe everything you read online. And, for a shameless plug, I just have to include my April Fool’s post on the Amero.

  1. Amero Currency is a blog that offers news and information on the Amero. It even provides information on where you can buy the latest editions of Amero coins (not legal tender).
  2. AmeroCurrency.com offers a look at a world in which America is superseded and offers information about the plans to introduce a North American currency.
  3. North American Amero is a blog devoted to watching for the Amero, and for the advent of the North American Union.
  4. DC-Coin.com is the Web site of Daniel Carr, the original designer of an Amero coin. You can buy his designs of Amero coins for novelty and collection purposes. Obviously, you won’t be able to spend them at the store.
  5. InvestmentWatch offers a post (with video) of Amero coins sent to China. With the U.S. dollar on the verge of worthlessness…
  6. Amero.aT is a blog devoted to “Amero watch”, with emphasis on an interpretation of events according to the Austrian school.
  7. Illuminati Archives offers video proof of an Amero coin.
  8. The Amero – What Are The Plans? is an interesting post from MyOneSource.com that explores the plan behind supplanting the U.S. dollar with the Amero.
  9. The Amero Info Site provides basic information on the Amero, and its affects.

Videos on the Amero

  1. Disclose.tv offers an interesting a video about the North American Union, the Amero and trade. Video includes Obama’s response to a question about the NAU and the Amero, as well as something from Lou Dobbs.
  2. InfoWars.com provides a discussion of the Amero on CNBC.
  3. NowPublic.com has a video presention on the Amero — complete with a rap song.
  4. YouTube has an interesting interview with Herbert Grubel about the Amero, and the backlash against the idea of a unified North American currency.
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